A Match Made in…

Looking at the calendar it hit me that around this time in 2015 I had completed my final residency interviews. Like all of the current fourth year medical students, I’d spent a lot of time, money, and energy traveling around from place to place, eagerly and anxiously trying to guess if and where I would end up for residency. Medical training is a strange experience. You’d think that a field that is based on the scientific process and data driven in many ways would equip students with the tools they’d need to not only choose the right specialties but also the right residency programs for them.

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Well, you’d think wrong.

Finding a residency program that suits you is like ordering a full wardrobe for 3-7 years based on online pictures, reviews, and referrals from others, but the catch? You can’t experience the clothes – you can’t try them on. You are expected to synthesize a bunch of circumstantial information mixed with some objective data such as salary, estimated cost of living, etc, and make a calculated, prioritized list of programs – the holy grail of lists – your rank list.

To that effect, as I’m sure many fourth years are currently pulling their hair out, finishing their fine whiskies and liquors, and ranking and re-ranking their programs over and over from now until the certification deadline, I want to share 5 pieces of advice I wish someone had shared with me when I was a big eyed MS4.

Disclaimer: There’s a LOT that goes into these decisions. I offer my humble thoughts here because I hope it will help at least one person out there struggling to make some hard choices right now. Obviously there may be some controversial suggestions below, but it’s meant to foster discussion and thought. I welcome your feedback too! Let me know if my thinking is flawed!

They’re in reverse order, because I’m weird that way.

5. Be a 5 year old again and use your imagination!

Seriously, one of the things I wish I’d done better in 2015 is spent time visualizing and picturing what my life would be like at my various potential programs. What would working in the ED feel like? What would the relationship I had with the nurses, technicians, administrative staff, respiratory therapists, consultants, etc, be like? Where would I live, if I moved there? What would I do if I had a family emergency? The more detailed your vision of the future, the more you will understand how your life might look like if you ended up at a particular program. This is a crucial exercise to perform with the top programs you are hoping to end up at. You may know they are going to prepare you in your chosen field well, but what will living through residency be like? The problems I have faced over the past 18 months have less to do with my residency program’s curriculum, and more to do with my finances, lifestyle, hobbies and how I am or am not able to keep up with them, what I can do with my wife when I have free time, etc.

4. When you talk to current residents,  pay attention to their walk, less so their talk.

Surprisingly, it’s easy for someone to look you in the eyes and lie. They may not even do it intentionally. After all, if you’re already at a particular residency program and stuck there for a while, you will find ways to acclimate and you may not want to badmouth your program. However, it is hard to fake satisfaction and contentment. A truly happy resident, a fulfilled resident, who feels supported and able to focus on learning and excel in their work, is a rare commodity in medical training. Looking back, there were some outstanding programs where I could literally feel the synergy between the residency program leadership and the residents themselves. When you are thinking of your rank list, don’t make light of your observations of how residents behave. It’s easy to say you’re happy but harder to show it. Lastly, if you found it easy to get to know residents, or if you were able to spend time with them outside of the interview dinner, lunch, and interviews, that’s a huge sign of a healthy residency program.

3. Run your rank list by your best friend, mentor, significant other…whoever knows you best.

You may have been told that you know yourself best, and you have worked hard to get to where you are today. Why should you share your thought process with others? Why should you let your significant other or parents or best friend mess with your rank list? The concept is simple here, really. We all have blind spots. All of us. And if you think you will figure out your rank list all by yourself, without discussing it with ANYONE else, you’re making a huge mistake. We are not perfect. We do not think of all scenarios. This is why you should discuss your reasoning and thought process with other people. The caveat? They have to be people you trust with your life. They have to be the kind of people you could call at 1 AM in the morning, and say, “I need you here, right now!” and they would buy a plane ticket and fly across the country or continent to be with you. If you discuss your reasoning with people like them, they will definitely pick up on things you may have missed. They will SAVE you from misery. Trust in them, and their judgment. Personally, I made my rank list, and discussed it with my wife a great deal. Ultimately, she helped me see that the rank list I generated was based on my comfort zone and what I assumed she’d want for us moving forward. By talking with her about the list, she helped me see that I actually needed to change my rank list to challenge myself, ensure I ended up at the best possible program where I knew I would be offered a chance to really grow and except, but also, to end up in a city that was a better fit for my wife and I to live and grow ourselves.

2. For programs you’re considering highly, go back for a second look.

The wisest mentors I had made sure to suggest this to me. It is quite doable for a residency program, the residency leadership, and residents to put on a show for you when you come into town for your interview. It’s also easy for you to play the interview game and ask the right questions and show the right amount of interest, etc. However, when it all comes down to it and the chips are on the table, the best thing you can do for yourself, whenever possible, is try to arrange a second look. First, whether or not you are even able to set one up is an indicator of the situation. If the program doesn’t have time for you, turn around and run…fast! If it’s relatively easy to set up, and if you ask to stay with or meet with current residents and this is also easy to do, those are all good things. When you have your second look, your goals are twofold. One, you need to spend time with residents outside of the hospital and away from the residency leadership, and try to get as candid an experience with them as possible. This can be a treasure trove of information for you. Second, you should try to shadow or spend some time in whatever unit you will be in primarily as a resident. This time, though it may be brief, will give you better insight into what actual work as a resident might be like, and can give you information to help you with your ultimate rank list.

1. Residency is less about the program, and all about YOU. Who are YOU really? The better you know YOU, the more likely you are to be satisfied with your decisions.

You have to really figure out yourself. This is the hardest part about this entire process. It is true that any residency will prepare you for a fruitful career doing whatever specialty you pursued. However, the time you will spend in residency is a life experience. Where you live, what you do with your free time, what support structure you will have…all of that will make a huge difference. But, unless you spend time really thinking about the things that are really important to you, it’s not really possible to make a good decision as far as your rank list. My dad always says, it’s hard to achieve a goal if you haven’t figured out what your goal is first. So I challenge you, work hard the next few weeks to figure out what you value. Write, talk to your loved ones, think…think a lot. You will need this soul searching to really make good choices so that when you look back on residency, as I am starting to do, you can feel good about your decisions and your experiences.

I wish you all a lot of luck, and want you to know that medical training is challenging, but you made it this far because you have something of value to contribute to this entire industry. Without you, and what makes you unique, we all become cogs in a machine. Let’s ensure we deliver the best care to our patients by first making sure we make the best decisions for our training.

Find me on twitter at @S_P_MD with questions, comments, or feedback!

Doctor, It’s Okay to Cry, Part 2

She lay there with her blanket pulled up close to her chin, with her arms buried in the three blankets covering her, as if she was in her own bed. My patient was an elderly woman from Bangladesh. Her daughters had brought her from home, where she lived with them, because she had been feeling generally weak and having more trouble moving around. She had fallen a few weeks ago at home and her daughters were worried her health was declining. The elderly woman, who was in her 80’s, appeared frail, but still had a round face. She was slow to speak, did not know English, and was very sweet and kind. The patient’s two daughters spoke with concern and anxiety for their mother’s wellbeing.

I pulled a stool stuck beneath the sink in the room and wheeled it closer to the patient’s stretcher. As her daughter’s translated for me, because the patient did not speak English, I took her history down. She was here because she had simply felt weak. She did not have fevers. She did not have pain. She sometimes felt a little dizzy. Her blood pressures may have been running high; sometimes her systolic blood pressure, which is the top number in the blood pressure reading, would read 160 or 170. The patient had not been vomiting, had no blood in her stool, and had not passed out or hit her head. But she had fallen. They described that her knees simply gave out beneath her and she had slumped down to the ground, unable to get up without assistance. The patient’s daughters were fortunate they were home at the time. They worried a great deal about what would happen to their mother if they were ever unable to be with her frequently, if she were to fall when they were not around. As we talked, my thoughts trailed off.

The patient was the spitting image of my grandmother. They were both roughly the same age. They had the same kind of wrinkles in the same places around their face. They had the same warm eyes, with different colors, but full of a sense of exhaustion at what their life had entailed. They had both raised large families, in countries and societies that did not have many resources or support for mothers, families, or young children. Now they were both in the twilight of their years, clutching onto what little strength they had, trying their best to adapt to the advancing world around them as their own bodies started to crumble from within.

I completed my discussion with the patient and her daughters, performed a physical examination by asking the patient to sit up, which she had difficulty doing. I helped her stand up, though she was quite unsteady on her feet, and begged to get back into bed. She said her dizziness was worse whenever she stood up. Her heart beat was strong and regular. Her pulses were equal in all her extremities. Her cranial nerves, which are important nerves which connect the brain with the rest of the body, were functioning well.

As I thanked the patient and her daughter for their patience with me, as this was only a few months into my intern year, I walked out of the room and fought back the tears welling in my eyes. I had just walked out of a room with a patient who was, essentially, my grandmother. Her daughters, with their concern and anxiety over their mother’s health, were analogous to my own mother and her sister. I began to think about all of the obstacles and difficulties this family faced in getting to the hospital today. They were in an inner city Baltimore hospital. The area around the hospital is known, sadly, for violence and crime. They chose not to call 911, but to bring their mother in by their own private vehicle. I could not help but think about what they would eat, as they are all strict vegetarians, and the time was now 1 AM in the morning. Any family they had in the country lived at least 5 hours away, including the patient’s grandchildren and son in laws. Some of them were actually back home in Bangladesh.

I tried to focus back on the task at hand – to identify what could be ailing my patient, what could be serious enough to place her in immediate danger – emergencies. I quickly listed out a variety of severe diseases and conditions which I needed to check her for, and made up my mind to admit her to the hospital because of her frailty. I was worried she may fall at home. I was worried that she needed physical therapy, and potentially a walker or a cane to get around. We completed her ED workup and admitted her to the hospital for physical therapy and occupational therapy, and to make sure we did not miss anything that could be contributing to her decline.

* * * * *

Five months later, while I was on my Medical Intensive Care Unit rotation, my heart stopped when I saw the patient’s name on my colleague’s admission paperwork. I became distraught and learned what was going on. She was being admitted to the ICU for monitoring because she had an infection, and was found to be very frail. Her vital signs were also concerning. My colleague offhandedly commented that the admission was unwarranted. I built up the courage to walk near the patient’s room, and sure enough, she and her daughters were there. Almost unchanged from when I cared for her in the ED. I could not bring myself to say hello, or visit her. I found a quiet place and let my thoughts race.

Will she be okay? What does it mean for her, to be admitted to the ICU? Based on my experiences here, patients did not frequently leave the ICU without difficult struggles with their health. Sometimes they even became afflicted with conditions as a result of our own efforts to help them – hospital acquired infections, injuries to their blood vessels from our attempts to insert catheters and tubes…I cried. I cried, feeling overwhelmed, feeling the weight of everything I had seen as a trainee, the pain and suffering I had witnessed not just that month in the ICU, but over the past 4 years in medical school, the prior 2 years in EMS, and the 4 years before then when I volunteered in an Emergency Department.

There is perhaps no greater struggle for us as nurses, doctors, and care givers, than to be tasked with caring for those who remind us of our own families and loved ones. But it is my belief that this particular situation – this emotional response and the associated feelings – is a necessary aspect of our work. I had been taught, both directly and indirectly, that these sorts of connections and emotions for my patients and their families, were not just inappropriate, but unsafe and dangerous. I disagree. Having done what I do for just this short a time, I can say that giving myself the freedom to feel the sadness, despair, frustration, and concern my patients feel, to truly empathize with them, is a source of strength. Many argue that it can cloud our judgment and bog us down, but my response is simply that the alternative, a world in which doctors, nurses, and others who care for patients simply ignore, or internalize what they feel, is far more dangerous for the nurses, doctors, and most of all – for their patients.

We must feel. It is our duty to feel. It is that very expression, that bond that develops between a physician, nurse, or health practitioner, and their patient, which allows us to deliver the best care.

An Ode to You, ED Nurse

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There are many people who work in health care. There are patient care technicians, physician assistants, custodial and housekeeping staff, dietary, patient transporters, nurse practitioners, and yes, doctors too. However there is truly, in my humble opinion, one individual in the hospital who does the majority of actual medical care. Yes, physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, technicians, they all contribute important activities for patient care. Physicians, and their teams, intubate, place central lines, deal with complex medial situations and make decisions that change the course of their patients’ lives.

You may have guessed it by now. Yes, this is going to be about nurses.

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Nurses are the heroes of healthcare. No ifs, ands, or buts about it. Anyone who tells you otherwise is in denial. My purpose in sharing my opinions on nurses is simple: they are never, ever recognized enough for their tireless, selfless, genuinely caring efforts.

Don’t get me wrong! I am not saying that all those who work in healthcare don’t deserve accolades. They absolutely do! But truthfully, I have never been able to thank the nurses I work with for their hard work and efforts enough, and this is my attempt.

A wise nurse I worked with at the Baltimore VA ED taught me last July, when I was a brand new intern, that patients don’t go to hospitals to see doctors – they go to receive nursing care. It was profound, and true. Doctors get the glory for good outcomes, but though they are essential in the delivery of healthcare, most doctors are pretty useless without the nurses they work with to deliver actual medical care.

Look around the hospital. Who is giving patient’s their medication? Who cleans patients when they soil themselves? Who dresses a patient’s wounds? Who takes the patient’s vital signs? Who assesses patient’s more frequently than anyone else in the hospital – universally? Who deals with problems with patient care as they arise more often than anyone? If you answered anything else but nurses, you’re wrong.

All nurses, wherever they work, whatever their area of expertise, deserve recognition for their tremendous efforts. I thank the nurses I work with each and every day. I have learned from my mentors that whenever I leave a shift in the ED, before I leave for the day, to share gratitude with the nurses and other staff that helped deliver care that day (including housekeeping, administrative assistants, transporters, literally everyone!) It sounds silly, but don’t be mistaken, it’s so important to recognize those around you for their hard work.

That all being said, there is one kind of nurse that I have tremendous respect and admiration of. If I had to be stranded on an island and needed medical attention, I would want this type of nurse there to care for me – an ED nurse!

ED nurses work in a chaotic, stressful, and unpredictable environment, day in, and day out. They never know what they will deal with. They are often the first people in the hospital to see the sickest, most helpless patients – even before the ED physicians! ED nurses are tasked with the often challenging and sometimes impossible – take care of everyone, address all of their problems, with what resources you may have.

Do you have too many patients to take care of? Did your patient tech call out sick? Is the nursing staff short for the shift? Do you get to call for help, or ask administrators to reassign nurses from other departments? Nope. The answer is a resounding, “Deal with it, friend.”

The CDC states that in 2011, there were 136,000,000 ED visits in the United States. Each of these patients were cared for by at least one, often multiple ED nurses. That means more than 1/3 of the entire country’s population has essentially been cared for by an ED nurse. Not all ED visits result in admissions, so you must accept that ED nurses are the most seen nurses in the entire field. Let that sink in. (I may be wrong on that, and if I am, please let me know. I just don’t see it being any other way.)

I have witnessed, since I first set foot in a hospital as an Emergency Department volunteer clerk back in 2003, ED nurses exhibit such unwavering dedication and commitments to their work. They are cursed at, spit on, yelled at, and sometimes even physically attacked by their patients. They are responsible for taking care of multiple undifferentiated patients with often uncertain medical diagnoses all at once. Furthermore, if we as physicians have any issues with patients, their care, or anything related, we frequently rely on nurses to help guide us to the next resource we need.

The best physician advocates for a patient in the hospital are frequently ED physicians, because they see the patients earliest, and are tasked with deciding what the ultimate plan for a particular patient is. However, the ED nurses who work with those ED physicians are even stronger advocates for their patients, because they are the first to bring up issues with the physicians they work with. I’ve lost track of the instances when nurses were concerned about a patient’s condition, whether it was because they were complaining of worsening pain, their breathing was becoming too rapid, they had abnormal changes in their vital signs, or some other reason, and they brought up their concerns with the physicians they work with. Most of the time, in a good ED, the physicians will learn to respect the ED nurse’s assessment. Good ED physicians know they should trust and rely on the ED nurse colleagues for their clinical gestalt, or “gut feeling.”

Just to be clear, as well, ED nurses have an awe-inspiring ability for versatility and resilience. They often deal with the sickest patients before we know exactly what’s going on. They take care of patients that should be in an ICU, where the nurse to patient ratio is often 1 nurse for 3 patients or even 1 nurse for 2 patients, BUT, often carry 1 or 2 ICU level patients AND 2 or more patients. ED nurses are efficient, quick thinking, and a TON of fun to work with. They are smart, they are compassionate, and they are incredibly fun. I am so lucky that in the ED where I spend most of my time, not a shift goes by when I don’t laugh with the nurses I work with, and they have made me feel better about difficult patient encounters or helped me deal with suffering I have witnessed more than I can ever thank them for.

This is why, for the rest of my career, I will be sure to show my gratitude for and advocate for ED nurses everywhere.

I thank you, ED nurse, for the tremendous work you perform.

I thank you, ED nurse, for the role you play in public health and wellness through your role in the ED.

I thank you, ED nurse, for the sacrifices you make to take care of the entire country.

I thank you, ED nurse, for being the ultimate troubleshooter, the “MacGyver” of all nurses.

I thank you, ED nurse, for putting up with me, my colleagues, and aiding us in taking care of our patients.

I thank you, ED nurse, for somehow finding a way to get it all done, while maintaining a smile on your face, and keeping me laughing too.

I thank you, ED nurse, for coming back day, after day, after day, after day, to see so much hardship and suffering, often in a broken and dilapidated healthcare system that makes it harder and harder for you to do your work.

Never, ever change!

To everyone else, #thanknurses! I encourage you all to share gratitude with nurses you work with. Let’s use the hashtag #thanknurses to let them know we appreciate them. Spread the word, get your colleagues in on it, and share the love!

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Why Physicians Benefit from Social Media

As a teenager I grew up using social media platforms such as FaceBook. It was mostly used to keep in touch with friends and family and waste time. Those days of aimlessly browsing news feeds and playing FB games are gone. I also had a Twitter account I hardly used and mostly because I never knew how to actually use it. By the time I reached my second year of medical school, I had lost any interest in social media and my FB has been deactivated almost all the time for the past few years. My old Twitter account was deleted. I enjoyed focusing more on my day to day life and went about my routine.

Eeventually I reconnected with my now wife, graduated from medical school, and began residency. As a fourth year medical student, I learned about the phenomenon know in the social media world as Free Open Access Medical Education, abbreviated #FOAMed. See this fantastic post by Dr. Chris Nickson (@precordialthump) on the concept and how all kinds of medical personnel (nurses, technicians, paramedics, researchers, including doctors). I loved the entire thing!

What could be better for all stakeholders in healthcare than getting together on a shared platform, discussing new ideas about medical care, medical education and training, research, and all sorts of highly relevant and important issues affecting people that deliver emergency healthcare worldwide?

It got better and better as time went on. I became an avid consumer of #FOAMed. I connected with not only globally known clinicians famous for their ability to educate and spread wisdom in medicine, but have gotten to know literally thousands of people I have never met or even spoken to who I now regularly keep in touch with using social media.

As I enjoyed exploring Twitter as a doctor, it occurred to me that most physicians think one of two things when it comes to social media:

  1. I can use social media to make money by publicizing myself and driving potential customers to my website and ultimately medical practice.
  2. Social Media is a black hole where doctors go to get sued and lose their licenses and there is never a time for a physician to be involved on social media.

I lesrned to to shy away from those physicians who believed in number 1, and I was utterly shocked and confused by those in number 2.

However, as time went by, I identified that physicians are perpetually claiming they have no time for personal lives, with families, to keep up with their medical work, that for the vast majority of them, learning how to get active on social media in a climate which makes physicians in America worry that they will get sued for simply looking at their patients the wrong way is not ideal.

Physicians are value based individuals. They are trained to look at pros and cons, and weigh options, because they advise their  patients to navigate those situations on a daily basis as their career. This is my attempt to share the value.

I posit that many physicians deal with burnout and poor job satisfaction because they lack a support group of peers who they can discuss their concerns, experiences, and hardships with.

I hypothesize that physicians struggle to identify what information is relevant for them to know.

I believe that healthcare social media, or networks and communities of people that are passionate about not just delivering healthcare but shaping its future, is the BEST place for an engaged physician to be.

  1. My involvement on Twitter has allowed me to connect with other individuals excited and passionate about delivering quality patient care.
  2. My involvement on Twitter has opened my world to entire fields related to healthcare that I never even knew existed such as healthcare design and patient experience design.
  3. My involvement on Twitter provides me with an added layer of support beyond my family and friends who work in the same settings, devote their lives for better or worse to guiding patients & their families through suffering and pain on a daily basis.
  4. My involvement on Twitter especially chat groups such as Healthcare Social Media, Healthcare Social Media Philippines, Healthcare Social Media Canada, Bioethics Chat, Medical Education chat, and Patient Advocacy Chat.
  5. My involvement on Twitter has taken me not only to the most fun, knowledgeable, and influential people in Emergency Medicine, which is my field of medicine, but it has taken me to the patients and their advocates who are working tirelessly day in, day out, to make sure that patients are at the center of health care today and tomorrow. For examples, you must get to know @NatriceR, @CancerGeek, @Colin_Hung, and @Colleen_Young.

Why should physicians be active and involved in social media? 

In 2016, we have finally reached a point where physicians can engage in social media in a professional way, without compromising patient confidentially or laws such as HIPAA. Furthermore, the entire medical field is encumbered by physicians and other healthcare providers who are exhausted, stressed out, and struggling to deliver quality care while maintaining their own personal lives.

Examples I have myself experienced:

  1. I have  met wise educators in Emergency Medicine and have had new opportunities come to me just because I am enthusiastic, involved, and willing to try new things.
  2. I have connected with countless patients, patient advocates, healthcare designers, and read their blogs and ideas, and have become a more innovative, creative, and open minded member of the healthcare world now.
  3. I have found much needed support from colleagues and other individuals who deliver medical care when I have been dealing with depression and emotional anguish related to work.

I never once thought that when I started @S_P_MD, that I would be so positively impacted by it. Now I cannot imagine a life in which I do not use #FOAMed or Healthcare Social Media (#hcsm). The time has never been better for physicians to get active on #hcsm! Share this with a colleague who is skeptical and connect them with resources to help them get online!

10 Commandments for Intern Year

I’ve been inspired by the #TipsForNewDoctors trend on social media. I’ve decided to start posting some thoughts and advice based on what I have gone through on my blog.

These are simply recommendations I can make for any first year residents based on my own experiences and observations over the past 8 months of intern year. I don’t have any evidence to support my words, though I hope they might help others.

1) Thou shalt be a team player.

You should make it your priority to be courteous and respectful to everyone you encounter. This isn’t limited to your immediate resident colleagues, medical students, or attendings, but includes custodial staff, administrative assistants, patient care techs, transport staff, literally anyone. Make it a goal to get to know as many names as possible. Many of my heroes like Dr. Amal Mattu and Dr. Michael Winters have emphasized that learning names positions you to be a leader.

2) Thou shalt take care of thyself.

If you are chronically sleep deprived, sick, or emotionally unstable, you not only put yourself at risk of burnout and further health problems, but you put the lives of your patients in danger. Imagine when you are on call in the ICU, in many hospitals making critical decisions for your patients without direct oversight at times. Seek help early if you start to find you are struggling. Every residency program must guarantee resources for physical and mental wellness.

3) Thou shalt read daily.

This is a tough one for me to do myself, but I guarantee you that if you can keep this one up, you will excel. Success as a resident, attending, and beyond does not require marathon study sessions in the library. Leave that in medical school where it belongs. Read about 1 patient you care for daily. It can be FOAMed, a review paper, or even discussion with a colleague. Something. Every day!

4) Thou shalt not incur debts.

While it may seem pointless to be fiscally responsible if you have hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt like me, do not be fooled. You will have limited month to month cashflow, and any extra debts you incur, especially for purchases you don’t need, will cause you unneeded stress when bills are due. Every penny you don’t spend is going to make a difference as a resident. Be wise with your money and you will be glad in the end.

5) Thou shalt put the patient first.

It may seem silly to emphasize this point, but entitlement and privilege are pervasive among medical students and physicians. Because of the hard work and sacrifices we all endure, the bumps along the way can be tough to deal with. Avoid giving into the urge to make everything about you. The day you became a medical student, and especially the day you start residency, you are truly making the rest of your life about your patient. You had many years to make up your mind about being here, but your patient, especially when they are sick, did not ask to be in the hospital. Maintain compassion for your patients and their families. We sometimes take health and healthcare for granted because we see it from the physician perspective. Try to see the situation through your patient’s eyes and you will understand it can be frightening and overwhelming to navigate the system.

6) Thou shalt not sign out loose ends.

Trust me, if you don’t know what I’m talking about, you will know soon enough. Do not be that resident in your program who develops a reputation for awful sign outs. Sometimes you have to stay late past your shift or call night to close the loop. Resist the tendency to think of it as doing procedures or examinations you don’t want to do; instead think of it as better for patient care. Nothing is worse for your patients than poor quality sign outs. If you need to call a consultant, perform a procedure, complete an examination, or finish a discharge or admission, be the resident that stays to take care of it. It’s not just a good habit to develop. It’s better for patient care, and that’s ultimately your first priority.

7) Thou shalt be professional with everyone.

This is a huge one. There are going to be times when you have a sick patient and you might feel like staff around you are not helping you with their care. There will be moments when you need help from a consultant or colleague in a different specialty or field and that physician may disagree with your plan or concerns. There are frequently situations when you will feel unsupported and like you are the only person who wants to care for your patient. You are not alone, and it is never, ever acceptable to be rude, discourteous, or nasty to others. It is never okay to raise your voice, swear, speak profanity, or speak rudely to another person. It doesn’t matter who that person is, whether a colleague, staff member, patient, or other human being. You are now held to a higher standard, and you must accept that, or you will flounder.

8) Thou shalt be early.

I must admit, this one is challenging for me even to this day, because I have trouble being organized. I am working on it though. That being said, it doesn’t matter what kind of residency you are starting, being early is the new “on time.” Showing up on time demonstrates work ethic and everyone remembers if you are late. If you develop a reputation for being late, it can be hard to overcome this moving forward. It sends the wrong signal, which is that you don’t care about your work. You most definitely do care about your work, and you have worked hard to get to this point. Don’t screw it up by being late.

9) Thou shalt surround thyself with positive influences.

Wise people rarely become wise by their own virtue. They simply understand that they are influences by those around them. If you seek out uplifting, motivated, and success oriented individuals to spend time with, get advice from, and learn with, you will 100% benefit from this. As you move forward, understand that not all health care providers are created equally. Some of them ended up where they are by mistake, are unhappy, and will try to get you to join their complaint corner. I say, find a senior resident or attending you admire early on, and reflect on what makes them so good at what they do. What qualities do you appreciate about them? What about their personality or professional life do you wish to emulate? Then, go one step further and identify where they may be able to improve. Write all of this down, and you have your road map for your own growth and development.

10) Thou shalt remember you are human.

At the end of each day, you need to take a deep breath. Being a physician, nurse, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, patient care technician, EMT, paramedic, or any other staff member that cares for patients, will be hard on your mind, body, and soul. You are not perfect. You have limitations. You should aspire to be your best but accept that you will have some bad days. Perhaps many bad days. Learn to laugh at yourself. Develop a tough skin to receive criticism and use it as an opportunity to improve. When you see patients and their families suffer, allow yourself to feel their pain and empathize with them. Humanism is sorely lacking in healthcare today. Patients, doctors, and everyone around can tell. Bring humanism back to medicine.

If you have any feedback, suggestions, comments, criticisms, or advice, or if you want to add your own commandments to this list, please comment or reach me at sspatel@umem.org or @S_P_MD!