Why Physicians Benefit from Social Media

As a teenager I grew up using social media platforms such as FaceBook. It was mostly used to keep in touch with friends and family and waste time. Those days of aimlessly browsing news feeds and playing FB games are gone. I also had a Twitter account I hardly used and mostly because I never knew how to actually use it. By the time I reached my second year of medical school, I had lost any interest in social media and my FB has been deactivated almost all the time for the past few years. My old Twitter account was deleted. I enjoyed focusing more on my day to day life and went about my routine.

Eeventually I reconnected with my now wife, graduated from medical school, and began residency. As a fourth year medical student, I learned about the phenomenon know in the social media world as Free Open Access Medical Education, abbreviated #FOAMed. See this fantastic post by Dr. Chris Nickson (@precordialthump) on the concept and how all kinds of medical personnel (nurses, technicians, paramedics, researchers, including doctors). I loved the entire thing!

What could be better for all stakeholders in healthcare than getting together on a shared platform, discussing new ideas about medical care, medical education and training, research, and all sorts of highly relevant and important issues affecting people that deliver emergency healthcare worldwide?

It got better and better as time went on. I became an avid consumer of #FOAMed. I connected with not only globally known clinicians famous for their ability to educate and spread wisdom in medicine, but have gotten to know literally thousands of people I have never met or even spoken to who I now regularly keep in touch with using social media.

As I enjoyed exploring Twitter as a doctor, it occurred to me that most physicians think one of two things when it comes to social media:

  1. I can use social media to make money by publicizing myself and driving potential customers to my website and ultimately medical practice.
  2. Social Media is a black hole where doctors go to get sued and lose their licenses and there is never a time for a physician to be involved on social media.

I lesrned to to shy away from those physicians who believed in number 1, and I was utterly shocked and confused by those in number 2.

However, as time went by, I identified that physicians are perpetually claiming they have no time for personal lives, with families, to keep up with their medical work, that for the vast majority of them, learning how to get active on social media in a climate which makes physicians in America worry that they will get sued for simply looking at their patients the wrong way is not ideal.

Physicians are value based individuals. They are trained to look at pros and cons, and weigh options, because they advise their  patients to navigate those situations on a daily basis as their career. This is my attempt to share the value.

I posit that many physicians deal with burnout and poor job satisfaction because they lack a support group of peers who they can discuss their concerns, experiences, and hardships with.

I hypothesize that physicians struggle to identify what information is relevant for them to know.

I believe that healthcare social media, or networks and communities of people that are passionate about not just delivering healthcare but shaping its future, is the BEST place for an engaged physician to be.

  1. My involvement on Twitter has allowed me to connect with other individuals excited and passionate about delivering quality patient care.
  2. My involvement on Twitter has opened my world to entire fields related to healthcare that I never even knew existed such as healthcare design and patient experience design.
  3. My involvement on Twitter provides me with an added layer of support beyond my family and friends who work in the same settings, devote their lives for better or worse to guiding patients & their families through suffering and pain on a daily basis.
  4. My involvement on Twitter especially chat groups such as Healthcare Social Media, Healthcare Social Media Philippines, Healthcare Social Media Canada, Bioethics Chat, Medical Education chat, and Patient Advocacy Chat.
  5. My involvement on Twitter has taken me not only to the most fun, knowledgeable, and influential people in Emergency Medicine, which is my field of medicine, but it has taken me to the patients and their advocates who are working tirelessly day in, day out, to make sure that patients are at the center of health care today and tomorrow. For examples, you must get to know @NatriceR, @CancerGeek, @Colin_Hung, and @Colleen_Young.

Why should physicians be active and involved in social media? 

In 2016, we have finally reached a point where physicians can engage in social media in a professional way, without compromising patient confidentially or laws such as HIPAA. Furthermore, the entire medical field is encumbered by physicians and other healthcare providers who are exhausted, stressed out, and struggling to deliver quality care while maintaining their own personal lives.

Examples I have myself experienced:

  1. I have  met wise educators in Emergency Medicine and have had new opportunities come to me just because I am enthusiastic, involved, and willing to try new things.
  2. I have connected with countless patients, patient advocates, healthcare designers, and read their blogs and ideas, and have become a more innovative, creative, and open minded member of the healthcare world now.
  3. I have found much needed support from colleagues and other individuals who deliver medical care when I have been dealing with depression and emotional anguish related to work.

I never once thought that when I started @S_P_MD, that I would be so positively impacted by it. Now I cannot imagine a life in which I do not use #FOAMed or Healthcare Social Media (#hcsm). The time has never been better for physicians to get active on #hcsm! Share this with a colleague who is skeptical and connect them with resources to help them get online!

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